Books, Beers and Ballpoints

Wonderful things by a terrible person

When I was doing extra and ad acting work in Australia and making mad union pay bank I was like “200 dollar jeans? Yeah totes that’s a good investment yeah I’ll buy myself whole runs of a comic.” and now I’m unemployed in Berlin it’s like “2.50 for dinner? That’s pretty steep. Maybe if I weep loudly enough outside this optometrists someone will buy me glasses lenses that aren’t covered in scratches.”

eschergirls:

nadadoll:

figure 1: head drawings by Andrew Loomis, 1956

figure 2: women’s head designs can be generated by the same methods, they don’t have to all look very nearly the same

Some food for thought for drawing women and avoiding drawing a single female face.  Too often artists seem to be afraid to give women big noses or lines or other distinguishing features, and we end up with the same face on all the characters.  I’ve been browsing a lot of genderswap art lately and I’ve noticed that when male characters with large noses, thin faces, wrinkles, or other features get genderswapped, they tend to end up with small noses, round faces, and no wrinkles, and they no longer look distinct (they also look much younger than the original).  So, just some references and a reminder that women’s faces have all sorts of different features, and you don’t need to just have small cute features with no wrinkles to have a character look female.

bogleech:

ronan-aodhan:

some highlights from dril, the vilest and funniest human being to ever exist on twiterr.r

"Don’t give birth to that bonehead in my office" is one of my favorite sentences ever written

(via ohnoproblems)

portraitsofboston:

“I used to struggle with depression, and I find it easier to just put on a smile. It makes the day better.”“Is it really that easy?”“It’s not that easy, but it helps. I’ve also just started therapy. But it’s proven that if you make yourself smile, you will eventually get into a better mood. They’ve done research, and participants who held a pencil between their teeth in a way that forced them to smile viewed things more positively.”

after holding a pencil in their teeth for 30 minutes, all test subjects were found to be feeling very positive about not having to hold a pencil in their teeth anymore 

portraitsofboston:

“I used to struggle with depression, and I find it easier to just put on a smile. It makes the day better.”
“Is it really that easy?”
“It’s not that easy, but it helps. I’ve also just started therapy. But it’s proven that if you make yourself smile, you will eventually get into a better mood. They’ve done research, and participants who held a pencil between their teeth in a way that forced them to smile viewed things more positively.”

after holding a pencil in their teeth for 30 minutes, all test subjects were found to be feeling very positive about not having to hold a pencil in their teeth anymore 

(Source: portraits-of-america)